SIRI GURU SINGH SABHA CROYDON

Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh

St. James's Road, Croydon, Surrey. CR0 2BU - Telephone No 020 8688 8155 - Registered Charity Number 282163

Please click the link “Police Letter” to read the pdf

ma 1 |

naanak aakhai rae manaa suneeai sikh sehee |

laekhaa rab mangaeseeaa baithaa kat vehee |

thalabaa pousan aakeeaa baakee jinaa rehee |

ajaraaeel faraesathaa hosee aae thee |

aavan jaan n sujhee bheerree galee fehee |

koorr nikhuttae naanakaa ourrak sach rehee |2|

 

First Mehl:

Says Nanak, listen, O mind, to the True Teachings.

Opening His ledger, God will call you to account.

Those rebels who have unpaid accounts shall be called out.

Azraa-eel, the Angel of Death, shall be appointed to punish them.

They will find no way to escape coming and going in reincarnation; they are trapped in the narrow path.

Falsehood will come to an end, O Nanak, and Truth will prevail in the end. ||2||

Please click it to read the letter

Police Letter

Vaheguroo Jee Kaa Khalsa , Vaheguroo Jee Kee Fateh ||

ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂ ਜੀ ਕਾ ਖ਼ਾਲਸਾ, ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂ ਜੀ ਕੀ ਫ਼ਤਹਿ ||

 

Friday 18 October 2013 Time 6.30pm 

Venue: Croydon Gurdwara 176 St James Road, Croydon

 

AGENDA

6.30  2013 Annual General Meeting

-       Welcome from S. Ajit Singh, Gurdwara President

-       Committee Introduction

-       Report from General Secretary

-       Report from Treasurer

7.15  Trustee address to members

7.30    Expenditure Proposition

-     Constitution

-     Charity Options

-     Any other Business

8.15  Q & A

8.30  Close of meeting

Refreshment & Tea

The AGM is open to the Croydon sangat. Anyone who wishes to attend must register with the General Secretary or website by 11th October 2013. Any items that wish to be discussed under AOB must also be submitted to the General Secretary by 11th October 2013. The Executive Committee reserves the right to manage the agenda and to exclude person(s) if deemed necessary for safety or other reasons.


S. Ajit Singh   

(Mukh Sewadar)

Date:  18th Sept 2013                                                                                                                                                                                        

    

======================================================

bilaaval godd |
aaj naamae beethal dhaekhiaa moorakh ko samajhaaoo rae | rehaao |
paaddae thumaree gaaeithree lodhae kaa khaeth khaathee thee |
lai kar thaegaa ttagaree thoree laagath laagath jaathee thee |1|
paaddae thumaraa mehaadhaeo dhoulae baladh charriaa aavath dhaekhiaa thaa |
modhee kae ghar khaanaa paakaa vaa kaa larrakaa maariaa thaa |2|
paaddae thumaraa raamachandh so bhee aavath dhaekhiaa thaa |
raavan saethee sarabar hoee ghar kee joe gavaaee thee |3|
hindhoo annaa thurakoo kaanaa |
dhuhaa thae giaanee siaanaa |
hindhoo poojai dhaehuraa musalamaan maseeth |
naamae soee saeviaa jeh dhaehuraa n maseeth |4|3|7|

Bilaaval Gond:

Today, Naam Dayv saw the Lord, and so I will instruct the ignorant. ||Pause||

O Pandit, O religious scholar, your Gayatri was grazing in the fields.

Taking a stick, the farmer broke its leg, and now it walks with a limp. ||1||

O Pandit, I saw your great god Shiva, riding along on a white bull.

In the merchant’s house, a banquet was prepared for him – he killed the merchant’s son. ||2||

O Pandit, I saw your Raam Chand coming too; he lost his wife, fighting a war against Raawan. ||3||

The Hindu is sightless; the Muslim has only one eye.

The spiritual teacher is wiser than both of them.

The Hindu worships at the temple, the Muslim at the mosque.

Naam Dayv serves that Lord, who is not limited to either the temple or the mosque. ||4||3||7||

Sikh by Choice August 10, 2012by jaskaur Source:ireport.cnn.com CNN PRODUCER NOTE jaskaur says she studied many different religions before she decided to convert to Sikhism. She took up the practices of Sikhs, like forgoing the consumption of alcohol and meats, abstaining from cutting her hair, and wearing the traditional Sikh headdress. She says when she wears a turban she is often mistaken for a Muslim. ‘I’ve had both positive and negative experiences with this,’ she said. She says she often has to explain to people that she is Sikh and not Muslim. ‘I don’t mind explaining it to them. It’s not a problem to educate people. I don’t want people to think there’s anything wrong with being Muslim, there’s certainly not,’ she explained. ‘It’s just that I want to be understood for who I am, rather than who I am not.’ Being a Sikh is a part of her identity. ‘Whenever I see another Sikh it’s like running into a long-lost family member. It’s great, now I have a family all over the world,’ she said. But she feels overwhelmed seeing her religion all over the media after the Sikh temple shooting. She says the shooting was a violation and she hopes people will learn about Sikhs from the tragic event. ‘I kind of feel like it is my job to educate people, if they’re interested.’ – Jareen, CNN iReport producer I am a Sikh woman. I’m also a white American. I became a Sikh after studying many religions, looking for the right fit. I chose the Sikh religion because it espouses all of the values I have been raised to believe are important as an American. Honesty; hard work; equality of race, class, and gender; tolerance of other faiths; charity; helping those in need; and standing up for the oppressed. As an outsider, I met little resistance when I expressed my intention to convert, instead I was welcomed with open arms. After living the life of a Sikh for almost a year (no meat or alcohol, no removal of hair, daily prayer, and other major lifestyle changes), I participated in the ceremony of Amrit, or baptism into the faith. That was five years ago. Since then I have proudly worn the five articles of faith, including the kirpaan (small sword) and dastaar (turban). I have learned to read and write the Gurmukhi script so I can read the scriptures as they were written. I have married a Sikh man of Indian origin, and we have an amazing and beautiful daughter. This tragedy has torn me apart. As a Sikh, I feel violated. I cannot believe someone could have so much anger, so much hate, as to walk into our place of worship and murder innocent strangers. I feel like my heart is breaking. As Sikhs, we call each other brother and sister, aunt and uncle, even to those we’ve never met. I feel like someone walked into my living room and opened fire. But I’m also white. Just like the terrorist. And I’ve watched in dismay as some Sikhs (mostly outside the US) in their pain have pointed fingers at white Americans as ignorant racists. And I pray that in their hurt and shock, it was only a fleeting feeling. Because most Americans are not terrorists. Most Americans do not walk into a house of worship and murder innocent people. As a convert to the faith, I feel like I should always be an ambassador. Sikhs want to know why I chose to become a Sikh. Why I chose to wear a turban, to be a potential target. Because it’s the perfect faith for me, and that matters more than a few misguided insults. People outside the Sikh community seem comfortable asking me questions about my unique appearance, the turban on my head, the iron bangle on my wrist, the small sword at my side. Nearly all of them assume I’m Muslim. I explain that no, I’m a Sikh. Not that there’s anything wrong with being Muslim, I always add. I always wonder why that must be said. Why I have to be defined by who I am not. I’d rather be asked who I am. I am a Sikh. An American. A human being. Just like you.

CNN PRODUCER NOTE     jaskaur says she studied many different religions before she decided to convert to Sikhism. She took up the practices of Sikhs, like forgoing the consumption of alcohol and meats, abstaining from cutting her hair, and wearing the traditional Sikh headdress. She says when she wears a turban she is often mistaken for a Muslim. ‘I’ve had both positive and negative experiences with this,’ she said.

 She says she often has to explain to people that she is Sikh and not Muslim. ‘I don’t mind explaining it to them. It’s not a problem to educate people. I don’t want people to think there’s anything wrong with being Muslim, there’s certainly not,’ she explained. ‘It’s just that I want to be understood for who I am, rather than who I am not.’

Being a Sikh is a part of her identity. ‘Whenever I see another Sikh it’s like running into a long-lost family member. It’s great, now I have a family all over the world,’ she said. But she feels overwhelmed seeing her religion all over the media after the Sikh temple shooting. She says the shooting was a violation and she hopes people will learn about Sikhs from the tragic event. ‘I kind of feel like it is my job to educate people, if they’re interested.’

- Jareen, CNN iReport producer

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